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[00:00] Interviewer: Interviewer/ Intervieweee – Speaker Labels
Designated label for each participant in the audio. Speaker labels will be italicized. The most common labels are “Interviewer” and “Interviewee.” For different labels, please indicate in the note box when submitting the ticket.

We’re gonna continue our lecture series on investing. Today we have the president of

<Company>, <Name>. <Name> De-identification

Removal of all identifying nouns in the transcript, such as names, locations, businesses, schools, etc. There are two types of de-identification you can select when submitting a ticket: Standard and Partial. thanks for coming in today.
, thanks for coming in today.

Interviewee:

No problem.

Interviewer:

I just really wanted to take a top-down look at what you do. I know just from doing a little research that you do a lot of value investing. Is that correct?
Interviewee
[01:00] [01:00] – Timestamps

Timestamps are inserted in the transcript at the requested interval. E.g., Every minute, every 5 minutes, at the beginning of each response.
Yeah. We definitely consider our firm of value investors much along the lines of Benjamin Graham, Walter Schloss, and Warren
Buffet Buffet – Red font
Whenever the transcriptionist is unsure of the spelling of a word, the word will be put in red font and timestamped (only) the first time it appears in the transcript.
. Probably closer to the Buffet of the early 1960s than the Buffet that many of us know from the 1980s to present.

Interviewer:

Okay. Well, maybe a good place to start then would be talking how you came to be a believer in that system. Then we can move into how you
Interviewee
Speaker Labels Designated label for each participant in the audio. Speaker labels will be italicized. The most common labels are “Interviewer” and “Interviewee.” For different labels, please indicate in the note box when submitting the ticket.
[unintelligible 01:48]. [unintelligible 01:48]. – Editorial comments Editorial comments are used when they interfere with hearing or part of the speech, or when they are necessary for understanding the context of the discussion.
Because I think in the past, in your investing career, you used to have a more technical approach to investing. Is that correct?

Interviewee:
[02:00]

[Laughs] Yeah. We’ve moved ways of doing things, partly just driven by experience, and the results from our investing techniques. I came across the probably, what is deemed the bible of value investing , probably about seven or eight years now ago, called Security Analysis: The Classic 1934 Edition. It was written by a guy named Benjamin Graham and David Dodd, who were both professors at Columbia, during the ’50s, when Warren Buffett went there. That’s how he met Benjamin Graham.

[Pause 02:50 – 02:59]

[03:00]

Benjamin Graham, just a quick history, was a Jewish immigrant, a [Foreign language 03:23] worked on Wall Street. I believe from the late 19— let’s say, 1918 up until 1955 to when he retired, and he rode the great wave up to 1929, then experienced the crash in 1930, which prompted him to write the first edition of Security Analysis: The Classic 1934 Edition, about how to value invest because he essentially almost got wiped out in the crash. He did survive. I think he was down 70-something percent during the crash.

[04:00]  

That really scared him. That made him think, we really need to come up with a way to invest safely our money [distorted audio 03:55] and really not take on as much risk to avoid—when these crashes do happen to avoid the situation he got into, where he used down a lot of money. He wiped a lot of people out. He wrote a second edition of the book, the 1940 edition which is the ’34 edition cleaned up a bit.

[End of Audio]

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